Weekend Links on Wednesday

  • I know that there’s something intrinsically wrong about it, but that doesn’t change my compulsive love for book art. And oh man, these are some beauties.  My eyes got really big when I got to the Alice in Wonderland one. Thanks to Fuse #8 for the fabulous find.
  • Laurie Halse Anderson wants to know what an author should do when a review gets the facts very wrong.  I agree with many of the commenters – a brief correction note coming from the publisher seems like the wise course of action.
  • Lisa Chellman reminds us that good and bad reviews aren’t everything – in the end, it’s each reader’s own response that matters.
  • Oh boy oh boy oh boy this is going to be gorgeous.
  • A look at the word appropriate, and the ways that the word is sometimes used to keep materials out of YA collections.
  • Over at YPulse they’ve put together a list of hip hop and rap organizations that are doing good in the community.  Anybody who puts the words hip hop in a sentence with the words education or activism has immediately got my attention.  These groups  are doing some great work.  And how can you not love Hip Hop Chess Tournaments?
  • Kids ♥ Authors Day is coming!  Pretty soon I’m going to have to actually make a decision on which event I should go to.
  • I don’t know how I’ve never seen Judging the Books before – this is right in my wheelhouse!  The 1980s, YA books, and making fun of book covers?  I’m there!
  • Jody Gehrman, author of the very sweet Confessions of a Triple Shot Betty, blogs about how she hates it when writers use replacement words like crap or frigging instead of using curse words.  I am in agreement with her up to a point – if the character would use curse words in that situation, then they should be there.  I don’t agree that words like crap and frigging don’t have any place in fiction – real people use those words, so why shouldn’t fictional people?  Just keep it true to the character and I’ll be happy.
  • Speaking of cursing – I know you all saw Neil Gaiman’s twitter reaction to winning the Newbery, right?  Made me laugh out loud at my work desk.  Delightfully vulgar!
  • Something that is not especially kidlit related – if you’ve never read John Updike’s essay on Ted Williams’ final at-bat, please indulge me by giving it a look.  This is the piece that I will remember him by.  Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu